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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 13-18

Prescription audit study from a tertiary care private hospital in Kolkata, India


1 Department of Academics, Quality and Research, Peerless Hospitex Hospital and Research Center Ltd., Kolkata, West Bengal, India
2 Department of Clinical Research and Academics, Peerless Hospitex Hospital and Research Center Ltd., Kolkata, West Bengal, India
3 Department of Pharmacy Practice, Manipal College of Pharmacy, Manipal, Karnataka, India
4 Department of Medical Administration and Quality Assurance , Peerless Hospitex Hospital and Research Center Ltd., Kolkata, West Bengal, India
5 Department of Quality Assurance, Peerless Hospitex Hospital and Research Center Ltd., Kolkata, West Bengal, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Subhrojyoti Bhowmick
Peerless Hospitex Hospital and Research Center Ltd., 360, Panchasayar, Kolkata - 700 094, West Bengal
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/QAIJ.QAIJ_5_19

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Introduction: Prescription writing is an important aspect of safe medication practices. Prescriptions should adhere to best practices mentioned in the World Health Organization guidelines and the National Accreditation Board for Hospitals and Healthcare Providers guidelines. Aim: Evidence about prescription audit study conducted in developing countries like India is scarce, especially from the Eastern part of the country. Hence, the current prescription audit study was conducted in a tertiary care private hospital in Eastern India in the city of Kolkata. Materials and Methods: This study presents an assessment of the quality of prescribing practice in a tertiary care private hospital in Kolkata. Six thousand four hundred and six medicine cards (6406) of inpatients were prospectively analyzed for the duration of 6 months. Results: The audit revealed that only 69.24% of medicine cards had captured drug allergy, 99.53% had mentioned the route of administration, 99.85% had dose strength, 99.89% had mentioned the frequency of dose, and only 75.35% had mentioned the indication/diagnosis of patients. Surprisingly, 90.75% of medicine cards had an error-prone abbreviation which was an issue of major concern. Conclusions: The audit report was shared with the clinicians every month along with regular training of good prescribing practices, which improved the quality of prescribing practice. Regular prescription audit followed by dedicated clinical pharmacology team along with constant communication with clinicians can improve the quality of prescriptions in long run.


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